financial strategies

I Want it All and I Want it Now

The neighbors have a shiny new sport utility vehicle to tow their travel trailer. They take a two week tropical vacation every winter. Their family room is equipped with the latest large screen TV and surround sound stereo system. Many people believe this is a sign of wealth. In fact, this is usually a sign of consumption.

More often than not, the above lifestyle is funded with huge amounts of debt.

How to Achieve Personal Financial Sanity

As the sovereign debt crisis makes its way around the world, creating havoc in its wake, we can be thankful that Canada has weathered the storm in fairly good shape. The media has given us a play-by-play on the action and many people are concerned with the outcome. While we can't solve the sovereign debt crisis individually, we can focus on our own financial situation. Here are 5 keys for achieving sanity in your personal finances:

Reduce Your Debt

Personal Finance & Job Transfers

These days, having a career presents many new rewards and far more challenges than it ever used to. What we used to take for granted, including our work location, has changed dramatically as companies continue to grow and even go global.

This can be great for a business and its bottom line, but really tough on the employees within it. Because we never know exactly what the future holds, you may find yourself facing a job transfer at some point along your career path.

Budget Your Way to Financial Independence

For the book The Millionaire Next Door, researchers asked the question, 'Do you know how much your family spends each year for food, clothing and shelter?' Almost two thirds (62.4 percent) of the millionaires said 'yes.' Only about 35% of non-millionaires said they did, even though they are high-income earners.

The millionaires also budgeted very carefully for savings and most save 20% or more of their gross income. Few save less than 15%. 'Why save so much,' you ask? Quite simply, for emergencies, opportunities and to provide future income.

These Rainy Days Aren't About the Weather

The last year or so has been a very rude awakening for many. Too many people today are so busy living a lifestyle, they forget that emergencies may need to be dealt with. It's all too easy to take one's cash flow for granted and get lulled into the belief that it will go on uninterrupted. Those who are best able to handle the financial rainy days that inevitably come along are in the habit of living well below their means and paying themselves first.

The Empty Nest Years

Many people look to the 'empty nest years' as a simpler time with fewer life obligations. As couples enter these years, the kids have usually left home, and retirement is just around the corner. In this new life stage, there are many opportunities to encounter new and exciting experiences.

A New Life Phase

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - financial strategies